Aun Koh, better known for his moniker, Chubby Hubby, and one of Singapore’s foremost food bloggers, tracks down the guardians of these disappearing recipes. He uncovers the stories behind our changing food culture, as he learns to cook these dishes. Through creativity, Aun pays homage to these traditions by giving the foods a modern twist - entrenching them not only in history, but also in the here and now.

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A Sweet Treasure: Dulce Prenda

Food blogger Aun Koh heads to Philippines in search of the Dulce Prenda, a vanishing pastry which was invented by the poor in the 18th century as a religious offering to the Virgin Mary. Through this “sweet treasure”, he hopes to discover more about Filipino cuisine, its influences and evolution.

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Tribal Rice Dish: Yao Yao Fan

A culinary discovery takes food blogger, Aun Koh up Taiwan’s central mountain range to a Paiwan tribal village. He learns about Yao Yao Fan, a simple dish that hails back to the tribe’s past as a foraging people. With modern conveniences and changing tastes, this dish is at risk of becoming lost.

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The King’s Favorite: Kachar Means

Aun Koh arrives in Jodhpur, India, for the king’s favourite, a meat stew called Kachar Maans. Dating back some 200 years, it was originally cooked in the jungle with game meat hunted on royal expeditions. But with hunting now banned in India, how can this deluxe camping food fit for royalty survive?

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Fisherman’s Delicacy: Curry Mohlyu

Food blogger Aun Koh is back on home ground, but finds himself totally unfamiliar with a Singaporean Eurasian dish called Curry Mohlyu. This is a food borne out of Portuguese Eurasian history and culture. Before they formed the backbone of British colonial civil service, they were fishermen.

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Eating Nose To Tail: Cabeza De Jabalí

Nose to tail eating, where no part of an animal goes to waste, is a current global fad. But for centuries, Filipinos have been creatively cooking bits and ends like feet, innards and blood. This week, things get heady with the pricey Cabeza de Jabali – cold cuts of meat made with a boar’s head.

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Eating Better Than Kings: Zu An Smoked Fish

China’s literati is said to eat better than the emperor. Bringing the pursuit of refinement into food, they create dishes like Henan’s Zu An Smoked Mandarin Fish, with demanding fire control, and intricate “flower knife work” which gets the fish curling like a blossom when fried.

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Soul Food: Daimyo Ni

Among the four styles of cooking that make up Kyoto’s cuisine, obanzai or traditional cooking is the least known. Aun discovers that even as some of their dishes are served at restaurants and sold at stores, Kyoto residents are losing the knowledge and skill to cook what they call soul foods.

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Pork Perfection: Babi Tohay

Made with a sauce that takes 30 days to perfect. An ingredient, 'grago' shrimp, that money often can’t buy because of sporadic supply. All the reasons why a Singapore Peranakan braised pork dish, Babi Tohay, is vanishing. Chef Malcolm Lee of Michelin-starred Candlenut Restaurant, shares his secrets.